High Sierra Endeavor Wheeled Backpack



High Sierra Endeavor Wheeled Backpack

High Sierra Endeavor Wheeled Backpack



$295.54

Get amazing organization and wheeled mobility with this roomy backpack from High Sierra's Endeavor collection. Inside, there's protection for a laptop and tablet, while exterior pockets keep essentials at the ready.


Macys Canada


Make Your Backpack Look Cool



Backpack Safety America

What is Backpack Safety America/International? Parents, teachers, school administrators and health care specialists are increasingly concerned about the issue of children’s health and safety with their backpacks. Widespread media attention is evidence of this growing problem. Backpack Safety America/International was created in response to this awareness and concern. An award-winning, entertaining and informative video, colorful brochures and large, full-color posters equip you with the tools for quick and easy presentation. Parent-teacher meetings, school assemblies and faculty gatherings provide ideal settings to share the key concepts of the program. While backpack safety is a critical issue for the long-term health of our children, proper posture and healthy ergonomics for future generations are equally important. That’s why Body Mechanics, Inc., creators of Backpack Safety America/International have also produced a family of resources specifically designed for early education and intervention. Click here to visit Pete the Posture Parrot for more details. Find out more on how you can bring Backpack Safety America/International to your school or school district. One Response to “Why Backpack Safety America? Sadly my chiropractic clinic treats many children with back aches and discomforts from carrying heavy backpacks. Slumped posture and unilateral shifts in shoulder and neck posture are often the result of children carrying heavy backpacks on one shoulder. Encouraging children to carry backpacks using both straps to even the load can help improve children’s posture and development. However, the root cause is backpacks that are too heavy for small children’s developing bodies and neurological systems.


UV devices like Steri Pen work just as well in the cold, but their batteries die much faster. Make sure to account for that. All of this however is not as large of an issue as it might first appear because in winter, liquid water is hard to come by. Most often, you will end up melting snow or ice for water. As such, it is easily purified by boiling. Of course, that will require you to bring adequate amounts of fuel. This is what I do. I also bring a few chemical treatment tablets, in case I want to save fuel. The first change to the stove you use, is what I mentioned above - you will simply need more fuel. Melting water requires fuel (unless you have a fire), and cooking in cold weather uses up more fuel. Make sure you plan accordingly, but don’t go overboard. After your first or second trip you will know how much fuel you use per day, and you can make more accurate calculations.


The second change is to the stove itself. While most stoves can be pressed to give some type of service during winter, an efficient stove has to have certain features. The main issue with most stoves commonly used during three season camping is the fuel they utilize, and how they utilize it. Alcohol stove, which work great for three season camping, struggle in winter. Since alcohol requires vaporization in order to burn, it has to be heated before it combusts. While that is not difficult to do, the heat generated, is often very inadequate. You can easily have a stove working at full blast, while the water never coming to a boil. Even if it does, you will use large amounts of fuel. Stoves which use pressurized fuels in a canister equally suffer in winter. Those small stoves like the MSR Pocket Rocket, which mount on top of a fuel canister require pressurized gas in order to operate.


The problem is that in cold weather, most of those gases remain liquid, failing to gasify and generate any pressure. Even the best fuel mixes, like those used by MSR, which are 30% propane and 70% isobutene have a hard time working. Propane will work in cold weather, but will get used up quickly. The remaining gas mixture, will not readily gasify. The solution is to use a remote canister stove, which has a vaporization tube, allowing for inverted canister use. In effect, by inverting the canister, you begin to use the fuel in its liquid form. The liquid fuel passes through the vaporization tube, turns into gas, and is then used by the burner. I use the Kove Spider stove all year round, which is of this design. The MSR Wind Pro is another good option. Lastly, you can get a white gas stove. Basically, these stoves run on a liquid petroleum based fuel.


It is pressurized by a hand pump. Then, much like with the remote canister stove discussed above, the fuel passes through a vaporization tube, before being used by the burner. Both MSR and Primus make good stoves of this design. Such stoves can operate in any weather, even in extreme condition. They produce a lot of heat, but in turn tend to be heavy. All that being said, just like with most other gear, you can probably make due with less than ideal equipment. Regular canister and alcohol stoves get taken out during winter all the time. Clearly with some care they can be made to work. Simply keep in mind what I have told you here, so you are not surprised when the performance is less than expected or more care than usual is required. The above changes to your gear, I consider essential to winter camping and bushcraft. There are other items which I consider non-essential for beginner winter camping. Snowshoes make travel in deep snow much easier, and recent developments in snowshoe technology have made them efficient, and easy to use tools.


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